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New From Rise
 
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Shrounda and Alise with their daughters.
 

The Color of Hope
Race can affect whether parents get the support to overcome.

My child welfare story (Shrounda) began when I moved into a neighborhood high in drug use and poverty. I was an African-American woman in my mid-30s, married with two children. I was arrogant—I thought I could control my drug use and that my surroundings wouldn’t affect me.>>>Read More

 
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Rise Issue #27 Fall 2014
Facing Race in Child Welfare

Children of color—especially Black and Native American children—enter foster care at higher rates than White children and stay in care longer. Research in some places has found that, even when cases are similar, families of color are treated differently than White families.

Change is possible when child welfare systems, parents and communities confront race in child welfare and take action. This issue explores parents’ perspectives and roles in reform.>>>Read More

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